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Front discs and pads change

Discussion in 'Problems, Fixes, Tips...' started by shane, Mar 17, 2017.

  1. shane

    shane Copenworld Regular

    Joined:
    Feb 29, 2016
    Location:
    Devon
    Car(s):
    Daihatsu Copen 0.66
    I bought a set of pad and discs (£50.00) and want to change them some time this month. I did the same thing with a Nissan Micra some years ago and don't really expect much of a problem, but I believe the Copen has ABS - I've not seen that before.

    My plan was to open the reservoir, take the calipers off as usual and push the the pistons back with a g-clamp to make room for the new pads, but I see conflicting advice about doing this. Some say to open the nipples rather then just letting the fluid push back into the system, which is a bit of a pain.

    Has anyone done this job themselves? Did you open the bleed nipples when pushing the pistons back?

    Cheers!
     
  2. Salieri

    Salieri Copenworld Veteran

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2012
    Location:
    Germany
    Car(s):
    Pearlescent White Copen (1.3 K3-VE)
    I personally would not open the bleeder valves as it might allow air getting trapped.
    Pushing the piston back as usual should suffice :D
    Pads and discs for 50 quid - what brand are they? I personally would not go for the cheap parts, on a copen they will rust away faster than you might think :D
     
  3. shane

    shane Copenworld Regular

    Joined:
    Feb 29, 2016
    Location:
    Devon
    Car(s):
    Daihatsu Copen 0.66
    Thanks - I had the same thought about the bleed nipples. Although I am wondering if it might make sense to do a complete brake fluid change while I am at it -assuming the bleed nipples will actually open without shearing off. I remember when I was into the old style minis it was possible to get self bleeding brake nipples - you just opened them and pumped for a while (with something to catch the fluid underneath the car), then closed them. Easy-peasy.

    The discs are 'Mintex' brand, made in Germany by TMD friction. They have been making brake parts for years. The pads are 'Blueprint' brand. I bought new shims too. My current discs rust like crazy - just a couple of days and they make a huge noise until the rust has worn off! I can't see these being any worse..

    I don't hammer the car, so I feel confident that the performance with be OK. The current discs are pretty worn.
     
  4. ronalddoes

    ronalddoes Copenworld Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2016
    Location:
    The Netherlands
    Car(s):
    2004 Copen 659 cc, 2009 Sirion 2 1000cc, 2010 Subaru Justy 1000cc
    I would definately recommend bleeding the brakes with every service. Just ask anybody to apply pressure to the brake pedal, open the bleed, close the bleed and then have them release the pedal. That way it's impossible for air to enter the system. Especially after you've pushed back the piston. Water is heavier than brake fluid, so any water present in the system always sinks to the brake cylinders and starts corroding them. This can be delayed almost indefinately by bleeding every once in a while.

    Good chance the nipples will come off okay. Meaning no disrespect, our Japanese friends tend to have a different attitude towards material choices than BL/Austin/Rover used to :party:. That being said, it never hurts to apply a good dose of WD-40 and leave it overnight before trying, if you're not sure.
     
  5. Salieri

    Salieri Copenworld Veteran

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2012
    Location:
    Germany
    Car(s):
    Pearlescent White Copen (1.3 K3-VE)
    Mintex is possibly the cheapest german brand of brake hardware :D Would not recommend :D
    Next time I would go for some nice ATE disks and pads, they come coated from the factory so they do not rust. ATE has been making brakes for 100 years now, so they should know whats good ;)
    You should flush the brake fluid every 2 years, its cheap and easy to do yourself, but quite time consuming. I had no problem bleeding my brakes, no broken valves or anything :D
     
  6. shane

    shane Copenworld Regular

    Joined:
    Feb 29, 2016
    Location:
    Devon
    Car(s):
    Daihatsu Copen 0.66
    I don't suppose anyone knows the sequence for brake bleeding a Copen?

    If could be back two first then front two...
    Or left (or right) first, then the other side...

    I don't suppose it matters too much - as long as the fluid comes out clean.
     
  7. ronalddoes

    ronalddoes Copenworld Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2016
    Location:
    The Netherlands
    Car(s):
    2004 Copen 659 cc, 2009 Sirion 2 1000cc, 2010 Subaru Justy 1000cc
    For reasons I have forgotten, you start with the shortest brake line (so if yours is RHD, front right) and then progress to the longest.
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2017
    shane likes this.

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