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Useful Tips And Fixes - A Compilation

Discussion in 'Problems, Fixes, Tips...' started by APPLEDjerry, Nov 9, 2020.

  1. APPLEDjerry

    APPLEDjerry Copenworld Newbie

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2019
    Location:
    Shropshire-Welsh border
    Car(s):
    'Lola': 2009 Copen 1.3 Silver
    'Griffin the Mule': Vauxhall Vectra Estate, 2008, 1.8, black.
    This is a place where we can put those little pieces of secret knowledge we've learnt about the Copen, as well as unique or original mod's - practical or visual, that otherwise rarely get written about or become lost in the depths of the forum.

    Whilst trawling through the entire forum for little nuggets of wisdom and hidden gems is great fun when we first buy a Copen, it is time consuming to do. Or we may only stumble across something by chance, only to lose it to the depths of the forum again . Maybe this could be a thread where we can deposit these little nuggets and gems of useful info in a more concise form? Plus, there must be many small mod's or fixes that members have come up with and we never get round to posting on them, or only if a new thread warrants mentioning them. I've acquired plenty in the year since I've owned my Copen.

    I also hope it might be a way of enlivening the forum with our newly discovered or age-old knowledge, so that others may benefit.



    If I may, I'll start with a couple of mine.

    The bonnet support stay / strut.

    I've found when working under the bonnet in the wind that the support strut was prone to unhooking. There then follows a big crash and much biting of lips. Somebody kindly suggested to me simply not to work on the car in the wind :drunk: I'm assuming that other Copens have this problem?

    So after much thinking and messing about involving zip ties and other dead end delights, I realised that if the hook profile was altered slightly by pinching it together a couple of mm, when the wind blows the bonnet upwards, the hook, rather than just sliding out of it's slot in the bonnet, it hits the back of the slot and stays in place.

    When I need to release the bonnet stay, I just bend it slightly near the top, which is enough to alter the hook angle a little and allow it to slide out of the slot with only small resistance. Since doing this mod the bonnet hasn't come crashing down whenever I turn my back to look for a tool. Or on of my head for that matter. This crashing would usually smash the stay into the edge of the wing (or it seemed to), which caused me to curse several times. Miraculously this violence never caused any paintwork damage, let alone dents. But it was too much to imagine it could never happen.
    Below is the modified, squeezed stay. I used a vice wrench to squeeze it, but basically any tool with long handles like a plumbers wrench will do the job.
    20200704_133817.jpg
    The eagle eyed amongst you may have noticed that I've added a short piece of electrical heat shrink tubing to the stay where it slots into the holder. The original plastic coating was wearing away and the stay was rusting. Hopefully the heat shrink will last a while.
    20201109_124757.jpg
    It might not look like much but the above picture shows the pinched stay hook which is pushed onto the escape position, but only required a little hand squeeze near the hook to actually release it.
     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2020
  2. APPLEDjerry

    APPLEDjerry Copenworld Newbie

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2019
    Location:
    Shropshire-Welsh border
    Car(s):
    'Lola': 2009 Copen 1.3 Silver
    'Griffin the Mule': Vauxhall Vectra Estate, 2008, 1.8, black.
    The other tip I wanted to share was where to put a phone, especially when you want to plug it into a double din media centre for sat nav, music files in the phone or Spotify etc.

    Basically, the solution to this is a leather phone sleeve, glued to the fuse box cover next to the steering wheel. It took me some time to get to this conclusion, after a false start where I thought the little recess above the fuse box (in right hand drive cars; I'm not sure about LHD) had to be the perfect place to put a phone. One big problem - it's too shallow for today's smart phones and no amount of experimentation (mainly in my head) could convince me that it was worth the extra time and effort to make it work.

    But I did get as far as making a hole for the USB plug and lead to go through and I lined the base of the recess with some thin black foam to reduce scratches and rattles. In use, the my Galaxy S10e would kind of balance on the shelf, but hard acceleration would cause the phone to fly out.

    Enter the leather phone cover/sleeve. At first I looked on Ebay for small car storage boxes, nets etc, but wasn't taken by their design, neatness or how well they would work. Then I got thinking about generic phone cover, or basically any cover that was big enough to take my phone. I reasoned that it would be best to get a cover a bit too big, especially if I bought a bigger phone or permanent case in the future. I bought this one in black, although I kind of wish I'd bought red now. I think it was for the iphone 8.
    Case For iPhone SE 2020 XS 8 7 Premium Leather Pull Tab Pouch Holster Cover | eBay
    [​IMG]

    It comes with a really handle tab, which you pull to extract the phone. To fix the sleeve to the fuse box cover I used some thick gel tape, after wiping both parts down with IPA. Because the fuse cover is slightly curved I only attached the leather sleeve with two strips of tape, at the top, but the bond is strong and the sleeve doesn't sag downwards.
    P1010888_edited-1.jpg P1010890.JPG P1010891.JPG
    Because of the over sized phone case and I wanted to be sure that the pull tab would reveal enough of the phone to grab hold of, I stuffed a bit of hard foam I had lying around, cut to the right size, down to bottom of the sleeve. So the phone sits a bit further out than if it was used as a normal sleeve, but it still fits well and is never going to jump out accidentally. As you can see, the earlier installation of the USB lead is in an ideal place, although it might be possible to guide it through a channel made between the the gel adhesive pads. It could be even neater that way, so I might relocate the lead soon.

    If you have a large phone and/or a bulky case already, I would imagine that there are leather sleeves of the same design for small tablets that could accommodate your phone.
     
    AFR0N1 likes this.
  3. APPLEDjerry

    APPLEDjerry Copenworld Newbie

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2019
    Location:
    Shropshire-Welsh border
    Car(s):
    'Lola': 2009 Copen 1.3 Silver
    'Griffin the Mule': Vauxhall Vectra Estate, 2008, 1.8, black.
    I wanted to do something about the "b" pillar door catch/hooks, which had got very corroded and scruffy looking. After looking closely at pictures and measurements of other brand catches I decided to buy a pair of 2007 VW Polo catches for £10 off ebay (in pretty sure the Polo catches are the same as on larger VWs, but were a lot cheaper. The finish on these is, if not mirror perfect, much smarter with no corrosion compared to the Copen's.

    At first I didn't think they were going to fit, as they weren't a perfect like for like fit. Fortunately, the securing plate in the B pillar is adjustable. To adjust that correctly I first installed the catch, not quite tight, then with a hammer and something not too sharp to use as a drift, I found that the rear mounting plate slowly moved to the new correct position. Result!

    To finish them off I bought some special red coloured stainless steel screws. They are M8 20mm CS screws.
    https://www.gwr-fasteners.co.uk/ekm...k-machine-screw-in-gwr-colourfast-34246-p.asp
    The company also has an ebay shop which maybe better for postage. I use the company direct as they are local to me.
     

    Attached Files:

  4. marnob

    marnob Copenworld Regular

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2014
    Location:
    Gold Coast, Australia
    Car(s):
    Copen L880K 2004
    Throttle response.
    If your copen seems somewhat sluggish in response when you put the foot down, check the throttle cable?
    In the older models it will stretch over the years and probably has never been replaced.
    Take the engine cover off if you have it on, and you can clearly see it.
    Loosen the lock nut on either side of the cable end and take up the slack. Makes sure you leave a tiny bit though.
    You can test it while standing near the drivers door with one foot inside. You will also be able to hear the throttle stop noise each
    time you push the pedal if you do it sitting down.
    Now you have a much more responsive car which will rev as soon as you touch the pedal..
     
    AFR0N1 and APPLEDjerry like this.

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