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Engine Replacements

Discussion in 'Modifications' started by Joy, Apr 13, 2017.

  1. Joy

    Joy Copenworld Member

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2015
    Location:
    New Zealand
    Car(s):
    2005 Copen L800K Manual 660 cc - a right proper one
    Hello again from New Zealand. My 659 cc turbo stock 4 cylinder engine for my twelve year old L880K has been brilliant. However, it now has 165,000 kms on it and I know it is just a matter of time before the engine needs a rebuild or replacement, so it is time to plan ahead. I was intrigued by the guy from Perth who put a k3-ve2 105hp 4 cylinder Sirion gtvi engine in his Copen.

    However I am not sure I want to lose my Kei car legacy. Is it possible to use a second generation Copen KF I3 turbo engine in a L800K? Would there be any advantage in doing so? I can see a potential disadvantage as no mechanic in NZ has ever seen a KF I3.
     
  2. Salieri

    Salieri Copenworld Veteran

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2012
    Location:
    Germany
    Car(s):
    Pearlescent White Copen (1.3 K3-VE)
    How can you tell the engine needs a rebuild? If it still runs great I would suspect it will still run great in the future, given that you service it correctly.

    The new Copen engine does not have more power and it would be quite hard to source parts for it, so it might not be a good idea
     
  3. Vin Petrol

    Vin Petrol Copenworld Regular

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2017
    Location:
    Stockport
    Car(s):
    2004 0.7 Copen
    I don't see any advantage unless it's easy to get parts from Japan in New Zealand.

    If you want to stick with Kei, how about the Suzuki K6A? It's 658cc, was used in the 2nd generation Cappucino so has good Kei car cred, and best of all it's still in production and being used for the current Caterham 7 160, Suzuki Alto and Jimny so parts should be reasonably easy to come by, as should the actual engine.
     
  4. Joy

    Joy Copenworld Member

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2015
    Location:
    New Zealand
    Car(s):
    2005 Copen L800K Manual 660 cc - a right proper one
    @Salieri, Actually, I have no idea how much life my engine has left in it. I have serviced it regularly and it is running sweetly now. But thinking in USA terms, the engine has over 100,000 miles on it, which used to be considered a good lifetime for an engine. Any idea how long the engine could go?
     
  5. Joy

    Joy Copenworld Member

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2015
    Location:
    New Zealand
    Car(s):
    2005 Copen L800K Manual 660 cc - a right proper one
    @Vin Petrol, Toyota NZ will (reluctantly) order Daihatsu parts for me, they come eventually. Also there are a few original Copen 659 cc engines in wrecking yards here. So if the new 3 cylinder Copen engine isn't improved from the 4 cylinder version, I guess there is no point in switching motors.
    As for the Suzuki kei car engine, I am not familiar with it, but I am thinking if the power and torque are about the same, probably not worth the extra trouble to have one mounted.
     
  6. jez77

    jez77 Copenworld Regular

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2015
    Location:
    Brisbane Australia
    Car(s):
    2003 Daihatsu Copen
    2000 Toyota RAV4
    I'd expect most modern motors to run well past 160k, I'd be thinking 300k should be closer to the mark. Rings, bearings, oil, filters and the blocks have all improved vastly since the 70-80s when rebuilds where expected more often.

    The only thing really going against the copen is the higher revs than your average car and being a city car more start stops could reduce life somewhat.
    A simple compression test should be the best place to start if your worried.
     
  7. lex schotel

    lex schotel Copenworld Member

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2016
    Location:
    victoria point - qld - australia
    Car(s):
    daihatsu copen 2004 ,, lamborghini murcielago
    I used to live in NZ , still miss the jet boating on the rivers :)
    I would love to put a k3 vet engine in my car , so in your hunt for an engine let me know if you find one of those .
    take care
    lex
     
  8. Salieri

    Salieri Copenworld Veteran

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2012
    Location:
    Germany
    Car(s):
    Pearlescent White Copen (1.3 K3-VE)
    Daihatsu engines are usually quite durable. There is one Copen for sale in Germany with 256k on the clock (~160k miles) and its still going strong. However, its got the 1.3l K3-VE engine.
    The 0.66l JB-DET engine needs more TLC, especially when it comes to oil changes (every 7500km, use synthetic oil like 5w40), otherwise the turbocharger might go.
    But I really do not see why you should invest into the engine when its still good
     
  9. gotboost?

    gotboost? Copenworld Regular

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2016
    Location:
    Brisbane, Australia
    Car(s):
    2003 Daihatsu Copen
    I'd echo what most have said here in that you've still probably got plenty of life left in the engine.
    Although, if I was deciding what to replace it with, 100% be going for the GTVi (K3-VE) motor.
     
  10. shane

    shane Copenworld Regular

    Joined:
    Feb 29, 2016
    Location:
    Devon
    Car(s):
    Daihatsu Copen 0.66
    How about this?




    I'm not sure how they manage reverse gear.

    The 1199cc bike engine puts out 178 bhp, restricted electronically.
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2017
  11. gotboost?

    gotboost? Copenworld Regular

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2016
    Location:
    Brisbane, Australia
    Car(s):
    2003 Daihatsu Copen
    That guy ended up selling his Copen. He had to go to a LOT of effort to add in reverse gear functionality.
    I think it ended up going for something like $18k?
     
    shane likes this.
  12. Vin Petrol

    Vin Petrol Copenworld Regular

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2017
    Location:
    Stockport
    Car(s):
    2004 0.7 Copen
    Reverse Box - Elite Racing Transmissions
    Seems the problem has been solved, plus I found a few threads with tons of different ways to get reverse - apparently one guy used an electric drill motor, I suppose you don't need to go very fast as long as it does go backwards for the test. Hard to find the legislation but apparently you require reverse legally if your vehicle is over 400 or 410kg.
     
    shane likes this.

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