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Toyota Completes Purchase of Daihatsu

Discussion in 'Front Page News' started by copenworld, Aug 2, 2016.

  1. copenworld

    copenworld Copenworld Founder Staff Member

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2009
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    Auckland, NZ
    Car(s):
    Copen
    toyota.png

    Toyota has now completed its full takeover of Daihatsu. The purchase was completed on August 1.

    Toyota announced the plan to take full ownership of Daihatsu in January, in which it already had a 51 percent stake. The two companies formed a business partnership in 1967, and Daihatsu became a Toyota subsidiary in 1998.

    Daihatsu will become the group’s core unit for small vehicle operations, and Toyota has signalled its intention to accelerate the development of small vehicles following the purchase.

    Toyota aims to boost its share in emerging markets, especially India, where low-cost vehicles are popular. In the Indian market, Toyota’s share is only around 4 percent, while rival Suzuki holds 45 percent of the market.

    Daihatsu, which relies on the Japanese market for 65 percent of its sales, wants to expand overseas, as the domestic market is expected to shrink due to an increasingly ageing population.

    Daihatsu currently has only petrol vehicles in its lineup, but is looking to develop a mini-vehicle using Toyota’s hybrid technology. It also hopes to benefit from Toyota’s driverless and other cutting-edge technologies.​
     
  2. Salieri

    Salieri Copenworld Regular

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    Lets hope they don't f**k it up :D
     
  3. freddyzdead

    freddyzdead Copenworld Member

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    Bit late for that...

    Even before I knew there was such a thing as a Copen, I was wondering why parts and information concerning my 2003 Sirion were so scarce. I knew nothing of the partnership and impending takeover of Daihatsu by Toyota. When I looked into it, and began to appreciate what was going on, I became less and less impressed by Toyota's stance and attitude. I can only speak from my experiences in Australia, but from about 2003 on, imports of all Daihatsu vehicles slowed to a trickle. I'm not sure about the situation in the rest of the world, but Toyota effectively killed Daihatsu in this country. Why would they do such a thing? I don't see that Daihatsu was robbing Toyota of significant market share. All Toyota has done is taken away from us a very good range of products and given us back nothing. I could be wrong, but that's how it looks from where I sit. Virtually all the Copens in this country are 2003 models, because after that, there were no more brought in. The same goes for the Sirion, and the whole range of Daihatsu products, as far as I can see. Unless there is more to the story that I don't know about, I have a lot of trouble not being angry at Toyota for what they've done. I have owned 3 Daihatsus and I came to appreciate the company as perhaps the most competent maker of automobiles on the planet. Seeing it skewered by Toyota is one of the most painful things I have ever had to watch.

    Have I crossed some sort of line here? If so, I apologise; I speak only for myself.
     
  4. Salieri

    Salieri Copenworld Regular

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    Toyota cars are also very good in my opinion, but Daihatsu definitely has more expertise in the making of small and reliable cars.
    They probably wanted to push their Aygo and Yaris, therefore Cuore and Sirion had to go...
     
  5. Vin Petrol

    Vin Petrol Copenworld Regular

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    The problem was the increase in strength of the Yen. Since all their production facilities are in Japan and Asia, it wasn't profitable exporting their cars to Europe at the prices they would need to sell at to compete with the bigger manufacturers.
    They went from 58,000 cars sold in europe (which isn't that great anyway) in 2007 to 12,000 in 2011, that's almost an 80% drop in sales.
     
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